At Gibault Catholic High School, we shape well-rounded students.  Our curriculum consists of the core subjects, as well as an extensive list of electives.  Browse our course offering below by department or download the complete curriculum guide here (PDF).

MARKETING

This course will introduce Junior and Senior students to the three important areas fundamental to successful marketing: Economic, Business, and Human Resources. Students will learn how marketing is used successfully in a variety of United States and international businesses. The students will be given issues facing today’s marketers and will have to resolve them with the principles learned.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1

This course is designed to introduce the students to Microsoft Office 2007 Professional. Students will learn practical applications to Word (word processing), PowerPoint presentations, and Excel spreadsheet.

Prerequisite: Required for freshmen

Length of Course: One semester (every day)

Credit: 0.50

PERSONAL FINANCE

A course designed to help students understand the impact of individual choices on occupational goals and future earnings potential.  Real world topics will include income, money management, spending, and credit, as well as saving and investing.  This is a required course for graduation.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior status

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.25

YEARBOOK

Students will use Josten’s online program to create the Gibault’s yearbook. Students will also be responsible for taking photographs and writing copy.

Prerequisite: Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

CONFLICT, SOCIAL JUSTICE & LITERATURE: SLU ENGX2250

This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Cultural Conflict and Social Justice. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres – including drama, poetry, and fiction – the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

Prerequisite: Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Must take CO PRO/CMP, CO RHT/RES, or AD Junior Comp to be eligible. A minimum of 88% average in one semester of CO PRO/CMP or CO RHT/RES is required. The average of the other semester must not be lower than 84%. A minimum 90% average in one semester of AD Junior Comp is required. The other semester average must not be lower than 84%. All students additionally must receive the recommendation of their Junior English instructor, exhibit mature classroom behavior and a strong desire to learn, possess strong study habits, and demonstrate the ability to work independently and meet deadlines.

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

PROCESS OF COMPOSITION: SLU ENGX1500

Develops effective personal and expository prose writing skills, including methods of invention, organization, audience analysis, and style.  Focuses on the compositional process.

The Honors Composition program fulfills the high school composition requirement at Gibault. Students must register for BOTH semesters with St. Louis U.  This registration is facilitated by Gibault.

Prerequisite: Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 and 90% average of their 1st and 2nd semester grades in Eng 2 or 88% average in Advanced Eng 2; the other semester average may not be lower than 84%. Students also must receive the recommendation of their Sophomore Eng teacher, exhibit mature classroom behavior and a strong desire to learn, possess strong study habits, and demonstrate the ability to work independently and meet deadlines.e

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

ADVANCED STRATEGIES OF RHETORIC & RESEARCH: SLU ENGX1900

Studies complex structures of language, including its logical and persuasive possibilities.  Emphasizes analytical reading, critical thinking, and research methodology skills.

The Honors Composition program fulfills the high school composition requirement at Gibault. Students must register for BOTH semesters with St. Louis U.  This registration is facilitated by Gibault.

Prerequisite: Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 and 90% average of their 1st and 2nd semester grades in Eng 2 or 88% average in Advanced Eng 2; the other semester average may not be lower than 84%. Students also must receive the recommendation of their Sophomore Eng teacher, exhibit mature classroom behavior and a strong desire to learn, possess strong study habits, and demonstrate the ability to work independently and meet deadlines.

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

AMERICAN LITERATURE (Seniors)

This course is a survey of the major periods and writers in American Literature, introducing students to our country’s literary heritage. The course will also review the general history of each time period so that students will understand how writers are influenced by the events and experiences of their times. Units will include Early American Writers (Colonial Period), the Revolutionary War period, Romanticism and Transcendentalism, Realism, and Modern/Contemporary Writers. The works of such major American authors as Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, John Steinbeck, and J. D. Salinger will be discussed in depth. Students will be expected to complete regular reading assignments, write 2-3 five-paragraph essays, and work together on two group projects. In addition, students are required to read independently one extra novel per quarter from a reading list of American literature.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ENGLISH 3: COMPOSITION: (Juniors)

Writing, Research, and English literature (320)
English 3/ Composition is a comprehensive writing course which builds on the essay-writing skills begun in sophomore year. The class reinforces the concept of writing as a “process” by approaching each writing project as five stages of writing; prewriting, drafting, revising, proofreading, and publishing. Course assignments are designed to give students experience in the descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive styles of writing. Specific grammar, punctuation, sentence structure and word choice skills will be practiced during the revision/proofreading stages of each writing project. In the second semester students will become more proficient in research skills and the use of in-text documentation during the research paper assignment. The last quarter is devoted to a brief introduction to some of the major post-­Shakespearean English writers and poets.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED ENGLISH 2

Designed for students who excel in language arts, this course is especially recommended to those who may be considering taking any of Gibault’s college credit courses as juniors and seniors. This course reinforces the Humanities approach to the study of literature: the literature is chosen to parallel the historical periods covered in sophomore history. Novels and plays in this class are written on a more advanced reading level and will be studied at a faster pace. As in regular English 2, emphasis will be placed on critical reading skills, literary analysis, and theme recognition. In order to prepare students for the writing skills in Junior/Senior college credit (CO) courses, this class will teach the basics of constructing an essay and research paper. In summary, sophomores who take this course will receive a solid background in the literature and composition skills necessary for succeeding in future honors courses.

Prerequisite: 90% average in English 1 and recommendation from Freshman English teacher

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ENGLISH 2

This course will continue the study of the major genre of literature (short story, novel, drama, poetry) as begun in English 1, but with greater emphasis on critical reading, literary analysis, and theme recognition. Each unit of literature will be followed by a project designed to further develop the students’ writing and oral communication skills. Through these projects, students will be introduced to essay writing, library research, and giving oral presentations in class.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED ENGLISH 1

This course is designed for freshmen who have demonstrated a strong aptitude for grammar, writing, and reading in the eighth grade and who have the ability to move at a faster pace than those in regular Freshman English. A comprehensive study of phrases and clauses, along with a review of the eight parts of speech, will enhance the students’ writing skills and help prepare them for Advanced Sophomore English and junior/senior college (CO) English classes. Also included will be an extensive study of the major genres of literature: the short story, novel, drama, and  poetry.

Prerequisite: Determined by placement test and standardized test scores; must exhibit strong grammar and writing skills.

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ENGLISH 1

This course will provide freshmen with the necessary skills for studying English at the high school level. These skills include grammar and usage, basic writing skills, library research skills and an introduction to the major categories of literature. Included are the short story, novel, drama, and poetry.

Prerequisite: 

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

FILM, CULTURE & LITERATURE: SLU ENGX2750

This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Film and Culture. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres – including drama, poetry, and fiction – the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.

Prerequisite: Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Must take CO PRO/CMP, CO RHT/RES, or AD Junior Comp to be eligible. A minimum of 88% average in one semester of CO PRO/CMP or CO RHT/RES is required. The average of the other semester must not be lower than 84%. A minimum 90% average in one semester of AD Junior Comp is required. The other semester average must not be lower than 84%. All students additionally must receive the recommendation of their Junior English instructor, exhibit mature classroom behavior and a strong desire to learn, possess strong study habits, and demonstrate the ability to work independently and meet deadlines.

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

ADVANCED ENGLISH 3/ADVANCED COMPOSITION

Advanced English 3/Advanced Composition is a comprehensive writing course that builds on the essay-writing skills begun in sophomore year.  The class reinforces the concept of writing as a “process” by approaching each writing project as five stages of writing: prewriting, drafting, revising, proofreading, and publishing.  Course assignments are designed to give students experience in narrative, expository, persuasive styles of writing.  Specific grammar, punctuation, sentence structure and word choice skills will be practiced during the revision/proofreading stages of each writing project.  In the second semester, more particular attention is paid to rhetoric, logic, and documentation as part of a final research paper assignment.  The course is designed to prepare students for the demands of college-level writing.

Prerequisite: Instructor recommendation

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

CREATIVE WRITING

Creative Writing will take the form of a writing workshop. Students will write every day through journaling, pre-writing, prompt exercises, composing drafts, editing, revising or critiquing. Students will be encouraged to think beyond the standards of academic writing in order to explore possibilities of language in a creative setting by producing original fiction works. As a class, students will read a wide variety of writings, such as short stories, poems, scripts, dramas, personal narratives, parables, and more, in addition to using visual prompts as inspiration. Students will regularly read their peers’ writing and learn how to provide and accept constructive criticism. Projects may include short stories, original poems, concrete poetry, letters, children’s books, parables, one-act plays, or TV show pilots.

Pre-requisite: Completion of English 2 & instructor recommendation. Must be in 11th or 12th grade.

Credit: 0.50

SCIENCE FICTION AND DYSTOPIAS

This elective course is designed to increase students’ knowledge of the literary genre known as Science Fiction. The course will feature novels and short fiction that depict future worlds, handle the complex ethics of future sciences, and present challenges that arise from new technologies. Emphasis will be on dystopias, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, human/genetic modification, and human psychology in a futuristic environment. Authors might include Mary Shelley, Ray Bradbury, H.G. Wells, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Margaret Atwood, etc.

 

Pre-requisite: Completion of English 2 & instructor recommendation. Must be in 11th or 12th grade.

Credit: 0.25

JAZZ BAND

Jazz Band is open to all students who have at least 2 years playing experience on a standard jazz band instrument. A student who becomes a member can expect to learn basic improvisational skills, a basic knowledge of music theory, and the interpretation of music in the jazz, big band, and rock styles.  Attendance is expected at all practices and performances.  Jazz band practices Thursday and Friday mornings at 7:15AM.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

CONCERT BAND

Concert Band is open to any Gibault student with at least one year of playing experience. The students participating in Concert Band can expect to gain a technical facility on their instruments, a basic understanding of music fundamentals and team oriented achievement. Band members are expected to participate in several concerts and performances throughout the year. Attendance at all performances is expected. Advance notice of performance dates will be given so that students should have no reason to be absent.

Prerequisite: Instructor approval

Length of Course: One year (every day)

Credit: 1.0

IMPROV

Improv is a form of theater where all of what is created – the action, the story and the characters – is created collaboratively by the players as the improvisation unfolds in present time, without use of an already prepared, written script. It is the art of listening and responding to the craziest of suggestions to create comic genius. The focus is on playing together, energy, commitment, teamwork, trust and making your fellow actors look good. No performance experience is required.

Prerequisite: None

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.25

ADVANCED DIGITAL ARTS

Students will be given the opportunity to build upon and expand the knowledge learned in Introduction to Digital Arts. They will work on projects throughout the year using the same Adobe Software used previously.

Prerequisite: B or better in Introduction to Digital Arts and instructor approval

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 0.50

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ARTS

Students will explore and learn the basics of Digital Arts using Adobe software. They will learn how to enhance and manipulate digital photos using Photoshop, design vector artwork with illustrator, create documents for printing using Illustrator, and create PDFs for the web and email using Acrobat.

Prerequisite: None

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 0.50

APPROACHING THE ARTS: ART - SLU Course: (ARHA 100-4)

This course is designed to help the student find personal meaning in works of art and develop a better understanding of the nature and validity of art. Emphasis is on the diversity of form and content in original artwork. Upon completion, students should understand the fundamentals of art, the materials used, and have a basic overview of the history of art.

Textbook: Gilbert’s Living With Art by Mark Getlein

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA and a minimum of four semesters of Art courses.

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 3 SLU semester hours

ADV ART 4

Course description: ADV Art 4 is a Senior level course and is a continuation of ADV Art 4. Students choose their media and sign a contract stating the quantity and size of projects to be created. Once the teacher approves the contract, it becomes valid. During the course students develop their style, improve their skills, and craftsmanship.

Open to seniors.

Students are responsible for purchasing their paint in addition to the course fee.

Prerequisite: ADV Art 3 with a B average

Length of Course: Either semester or year (every other day)

Credit: 0.50 per semester

ADV ART 3

ADV Art 3 is designed for the serious art student. Once a student is enrolled in this class, he/she is expected to maintain self-discipline and responsibility. ADV Art 3 is a combination of Drawing, Painting and Mixed Media. On a quarterly basis, each student chooses the media he/she would like to work with and signs a contract stating the quantity and size of projects to be created. This contract will be submitted to the teacher for approval. Once the contract has been approved, it becomes valid.

Open to juniors and seniors.

Students are responsible for purchasing their paint.

Prerequisite: Drawing 1 with a B average

Length of Course: Either semester or year (every other day)

Credit: 0.50 per semester

CERAMICS 3 & 4

This course reviews the techniques learned in Ceramics 1 and 2. Ceramics 3 and Ceramics 4 are designed for the SERIOUS art student. Emphasis is on individual direction. Each student will be expected to possess self-discipline and meet ALL deadlines.

Open to juniors and seniors.

Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 and 2 with B average in each

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.25

CERAMICS 2

This course reviews the techniques learned in Ceramics I with a greater emphasis on design and decoration. The following assignments will be completed: 1. set 2. mask 3. game 4. thrown piece 5. bust or part/animal-part/container 6. sculpture 7. choice 8. relief 9. choice 10. textured container.

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 with a B average

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.25

CERAMICS 1

Students are taught the basic skills of ceramics. Pinch, coil, and slab techniques will be introduced and used again and again to build the following projects: 1. round pinch 2. creative pinch 3. twelve inch coil container 4. slab container 5. six inch combination container 6. model 7. handle project 8. realistic copy of food 9. chimes.

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.25

DRAW 2

Students build on their skills in drawing and design. Creative thinking is emphasized at this level. Students work from the figure, objects, still life, and the landscape. Students are also exposed to creative fantasy drawing and illustration. A sketchbook will be required of all students. One sketch will be required each month, as long as a B average is maintained.

Cost for a sketch book will be required in addition to course fee.

Prerequisite: Drawing and Design I with a B average

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

DRAW 1

First Semester-The first quarter is designed to awaken the beginner’s skills in FREEHAND DRAWING. Basic exercises to develop student powers of observation are emphasized in the use of pencil, marker, pen and ink. The second quarter students create attractive design projects such as scratchboard, lettering, and Christmas projects. Students learn how to cut and mat their own drawings. A sketchbook will be required of all students. One sketch will be required each week.

Second Semester-Color and design is offered during the third quarter. Students learn techniques suitable to various types of water paints. Demonstrations in using brush for special effects are introduced. One point and two-point perspective are demonstrated. Fourth quarter emphasis is on CREATIVE DRAWING. Shading techniques and rendering of surface textures are stressed. Students use pastels and pencils to draw from memory. Landscape and on the spot drawing of plant life is stressed.

Cost for a sketch book will be required in addition to course fee.

Prerequisite: None

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

MIXED CHORUS

This is a vocally balanced group open to anyone who has the ability to match pitch. Basic musicianship and knowledge of part-singing along with a desire to contribute one’s best effort for the group is essential for membership. Perfect attendance in class and performance, good conduct and improvement of one’s musicianship is expected. Mixed Chorus members are expected to participate in several concerts throughout the year.

Prerequisite: Instructor approval

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 0.50

PHOTOGRAPHY

Students will explore and learn the basics of digital photography. They will learn basic parts of a camera and how to use it. Students will learn how to get out of auto mode and into manual mode. Students will also learn basic composition rules.

Prerequisite: None

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

HONORS CALCULUS 2

This course will build on the skills learned in HN Calculus 1. Topics in this course will include applications of integration, additional integration techniques, and infinite series. At the conclusion of this course students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam. (Passing this exam with a high score will gain students college credit)

Prerequisite: B average in Honors Calculus 1 and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

COLLEGE CALCULUS: SLU CREDIT COURSE FOR JUN/SEN SLU Course (MT X142)

Students who have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 may take CO Calculus 1 for college credit through St. Louis University’s 1-8-1-8 program. St. Louis University tuition was $65 per credit during the 2008-2009 school year. Four hours of college credit are awarded for successful completion of this course.

Calculus is a useful tool in the study of or in the everyday operation of business, physics, operations research, engineering or actuarial science. Students should possess an advanced ability to analyze problems using a broad basis of techniques. Topics in this course will include functions, limits, derivatives, curve sketching and basic integration techniques. Content of the course is equivalent to a regular one-semester college Calculus 1 course. Students have the choice of taking the course for college credit through the SLU 1818 ACC program or, at the conclusion of the course, students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam for use at the college or university of their choice.

Prerequisite: B average in College Algebra, Trigonometry and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HONORS CALCULUS 1

Calculus is a useful tool in the study of or in the everyday operation of business, physics, operations research, engineering or actuarial science. Students should possess an advanced ability to analyze problems using a broad basis of techniques. Topics in this course will include functions, limits, derivatives, curve sketching and basic integration techniques. Content of the course is equivalent to a regular one-semester college Calculus 1 course. Students have the choice of taking the course for college credit through the SLU 1818 ACC program or, at the conclusion of the course, students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Exam for use at the college or university of their choice.

Prerequisite: B average in College Algebra, Trigonometry and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

STATISTICS

This course is designed for students who want to take an elective math course. Many major areas of study in college require a statistics course and this course will serve as an introduction. Topics will include measures of center and measures of spread, analyzing graphs, the normal curve, general probability, and hypothesis testing.

Prerequisite: C average in Algebra 2 and junior or senior status

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HONORS COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY

This course is designed to give the student the necessary background for a beginning study of Calculus. The first semester will be spent in an in depth study of trigonometry. The second semester will be spent studying topics in College Algebra such as exponential equations, logarithms, conic sections, vectors, sequences, series, polar coordinates, and probability.

Prerequisite: C average in both Geometry and Algebra 2 & recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED GEOMETRY

This course is designed for students who have a strong aptitude in mathematics, excellent work and study habits, and the ability to move at a faster pace than students in a regular Geometry course. Topics in Advanced Geometry will be studied in greater depth and students will work more challenging problems. This course has two major goals. One is to introduce students to the language symbols, and relationships which exist between geometrical figures in two and three dimensions. The second goal is to develop logical thinking through extensive writing of geometric proofs. The student will learn to use reason to prove facts about the relationship of lines, angles, triangles, circles, polygons, and 3-dimensional figures. It is necessary for students to be able to think independently, explore many possibilities, and analyze situations in order to succeed in Advanced Geometry.

Prerequisite: C average in AD Algebra 2 or A average in Algebra 2 and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

GEOMETRY

This course has two major goals. One is to introduce students to the language, symbols, and relationships which exist between geometrical figures in two or three dimensions. The second goal is to develop logical thinking through the extensive writing of geometric proofs. The student will learn to use reason to prove facts about the relationship of lines, angles, triangles, circles, polygons and 3-dimensional figures. It is necessary for students to be able to think independently, explore many possibilities, and analyze situations in order to succeed in Geometry.

Prerequisite: C average in Algebra 2 and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOMETRY

Basic Geometry will develop the student’s ability to think clearly and logically. Students will be able to recognize geometric figures and concepts in the world around them. Students will apply geometric concepts through the use of drawings and constructions. Topics to be covered in Basic Geometry include distance, angle measurement, angle relationships, triangles and congruence, triangle relationships, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, similarity and similar triangles, polygons, circles, space figures, perimeter, area, volume, coordinate geometry, and trigonometric ratios. Formal mathematical reasoning (proofs) will be used to develop concepts.

Prerequisite: D average in Fundamentals of Algebra (course 151) or D average or completion of Intermediate Algebra 2 and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED ALGEBRA 2

This course is designed for students who have a strong aptitude in mathematics, excellent work and study habits, and the ability to move at a faster pace than the students in a regular Algebra 2 course. Topics in Advanced Algebra 2 will be studied in more depth and students will work more challenging problems. The course reviews Algebra 1 and extends that knowledge to include new techniques of factoring polynomials and solving equations. Additional topics include matrices, radicals, complex numbers, the conic sections, quadratic systems, exponential and logarithmic functions, and basic trigonometry.

Prerequisite: A average in Algebra 1 & recommendation of teacher (8th graders also need high math scores on standardized tests. 8th grade students need a FULL course in Algebra 1 before attempting an Algebra 2 course.)

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ALGEBRA 2

This course reviews Algebra 1 and extends that knowledge to include new techniques of factoring polynomials and solving equations. Additional topics include matrices, radicals, complex numbers, the conic sections, quadratic systems, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and basic trigonometry.

Prerequisite: B average in Alg 1 and recommendation of teacher. (8th grade students need a FULL course in Alg 1 before attempting a course in Alg 2)

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 2

This course will include new techniques of factoring polynomials and solving equations. Additional topics that will be covered in the first semester include: analyzing equations and inequalities, graphing linear relations and functions, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, and using matrices. Additional topics that will be covered in the second semester include: exploring polynomials and radical expressions, complex numbers, exploring quadratic functions and inequalities, analyzing conic sections and exploring polynomial functions.

Prerequisite: C average in Algebra 1 and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED ALGEBRA 1

This course is designed for students who have a strong aptitude in mathematics, excellent work and study habits, and the ability to move at a faster pace than the students in a regular Algebra 1 course. Topics in Advanced Algebra 1 will be studied in more depth and students will work more challenging problems. The course reviews Algebra 1 and extends that knowledge to include new techniques for solving equations, inequalities and word problems. Polynomials and linear systems, positive and negative exponent operations, perimeter, area, and volume of basic and complex shapes are studied in depth.

Prerequisite: Evidence of a strong math aptitude on standardized tests and a full year course of Algebra 1 at the grade school level with a grade of C or higher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ALGEBRA 1

Algebra 1 provides the basic language, symbols and operations necessary for solving equations, inequalities and word problems. Polynomials and linear systems, positive and negative exponent operations, perimeter, area, and volume of basic and complex shapes are studied in depth. Algebra 1 provides the foundation for all upper level courses in mathematics.

Prerequisite: Above average score on standardized tests. A good background of pre-algebra or at least part of an Algebra 1 course in grade school

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

FUNDAMENTALS OF ALGEBRA

This course will build on basic number concepts and properties.  Topics covered include positive and negative numbers, solving equations, percents, ratios, proportions, graphing functions, inequalities, probability, polynomials, factoring and systems of equations.

Prerequisite: Placement by scores on standardized tests

Length of Course:One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA

This course is an introduction to basic algebraic structure and skills.  Basic number concepts and properties are reviewed and enhanced as skills in problem solving are introduced.  Topics covered include positive and negative numbers, solving equations, percents, ratios, proportions, and inequalities.

Prerequisite: Placement by scores on standardized tests

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY

This course is designed to give the student the necessary background for a beginning study of Calculus. The first semester will be spent in an in depth study of trigonometry. The second semester will be spent studying topics in College Algebra such as exponential equations, logarithms, conic sections, vectors, sequences, series, polar coordinates, and probability.

Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra 2 and recommendation of teacher

Length of Course: One year (6 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HEALTH

Course topics will include the elements of health, mental health, nutrition, the body and exercise, public and environmental health, consumer health, safety education and personal health habits.  In class, students will discuss current events involving health-related topics.

This course is required for all Sophomores.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.25

Sports PE

Coed weight-training course for Gibault’s student athletes.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One semester or one year (every other day)

Credit: 0.25 per semester

Girls' PE

The girls’ PE class is a female-only class designed to give students the optimal environment for participation. The class will include walking and running for time and distance, weight training sessions, and various sport competitions.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One semester or one year (every other day)

Credit: 0.25 per semester

Boys' PE

The boys’ PE class is a male-only class designed to give students the optimal environment for participation. The class will include walking and running for time and distance, weight training sessions, and various sport competitions.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One semester or one year (every other day)

Credit: 0.25 per semester

PUBLIC SPEAKING

This course is designed to develop students’ speaking skills. Students will learn the theory and skills necessary to prepare and deliver speeches. The three elements of effective speaking-verbal, visual, and vocal-plus the importance of positive imagery in building confidence will be introduced.

REQUIRED FOR ALL SENIORS.

Prerequisite: None

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 0.50

DRIVER EDUCATION

The classroom portion of the course is designed to teach the beginning driver the concepts necessary for safe motoring. The behind-the-wheel phase is designed to give the students sufficient driving experience to assume the role of a licensed driver. An instruction permit from the state is required for the driving portion ($20.00) and a driving fee is required by the school ($150.00). This class will be taught by an instructor from Waterloo High School.

Note: class is first filled by sophomores; freshmen may be added only if their schedule will accommodate the class without changing courses/ class sizes (as defined by administration). Students must be 15 within the semester of the course.

Prerequisite: Students must be at least 15

Length of Course: Every day

Credit: 0.25

EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER

This elective course is designed to give students emergency medical training as an introduction to emergency services or the medical field. Students will be trained in fundamental life-saving skills and procedures, as well as injury and illness care. The course will cover anatomy and physiology of the body and will include hands-on skill assessments. This course will result in state licensure and will be dual-credit with Southwestern Illinois College for their Emergency Medical Services Program as well as their Associate’s Degree track.

Pre-requisite: Senior Standing

Credit: .50

SOPHOMORE RELIGION

Semester 1: Introduction to Hebrew Scripture

The first semester is an introduction to the Hebrew Scripture. The Hebrew Scripture is the foundation for much of our Christian faith. This course acquaints students with the books of the Hebrew Scripture. The class will analyze each work for historical significance and for what it reveals to each student religiously. A close reading of the Bible will be undertaken in order to help students become closer to their faith. Each student will be required to bring or purchase a Bible. Students will plan prayer services, integrating what they learn in the Bible with worship.

Semester 2: Christian Scripture

The second semester will be a study of the Christian Scripture including the historical Jesus and the Jesus of faith.

Prerequisite:

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

JUNIOR RELIGION

Semester 1: Faith and Sacraments
This course combines a study of the Sacraments of the Catholic Church with some of the basic beliefs which Catholics express in the Creed. The purpose of this course is not only to give the students a deeper knowledge of the Sacraments and their Catholic Faith, but it is also hoped that this will lead to a deeper appreciation and a more meaningful living of their Catholic Faith.

Semester 2: Christian Morality
During this course Juniors will have opportunities to ponder choices in their personal behavior and lifestyles, as well as societal values and norms that influence those choices. The course affirms the belief that Jesus and his Church provide a life-affirming vision, thoughtful guidance, inspiring stories, and essential norms for making decisions about how to dwell together creatively and conscientiously. The first part of the course concerns the traditional categories used within the community to formulate its moral purpose such as the teaching of Jesus, Scripture, conscience, character, law, sin, and virtue. The second part is a systematic presentation of major moral issues. Students will learn what Church leaders have to say about these current and controversial topics. Student evaluation is based on tests, papers, and projects.

Prerequisite: Required for all Juniors

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

SENIOR RELIGION:  THE CHURCH AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Semester 1: Justice
This course will direct the students’ attention to justice issues in today’s world. A study of Church statements and government documents on the issues will be covered. Students are required to perform a final research project on a justice issue.

Semester 2: Morality
Second semester- This semester includes a comprehensive survey of Catholic morality that involves the quest to be responsible, both as individuals and communities.  It encourages a prayerful attitude of adoration, praise, thanksgiving, confidence, supplication, and awe for God’s story, and promotes right action.

Prerequisite: Required of all Seniors

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

FRESHMAN RELIGION

Semester 1: God’s Revelation to the World
This semester covers how Jesus Christ is the unique Word of Sacred Scripture and how God’s mission of Salvation is revealed in the Old Testament and the New Testament.  It also touches on the human desire to know and love God through the Sacred Scripture.

Semester 2: Jesus Christ – His Mission and Ministry
This semester covers how God reveals himself, especially in the Three Divine Persons of the Trinity.  Students will also learn deeper ways to reflect and pray about the mystery of the Incarnation, Jesus Christ fully God and fully man.

Prerequisite: Required for all Freshmen

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

ANIMAL SCIENCE

This animal science course is offered to students to develop knowledge and skills pertaining to the identification, nutrition, reproduction, health, veterinary science, and management of small and large animals. Units will include large production animals, small pet animals, and alternative animals. Student taking this course must complete a meaningful SAE and keep accurate records. Membership and participation in the FFA is strongly recommended. Completion of this course counts as one credit toward science graduation credits.

Prerequisite: AG 197 or AG 198 or biology and chemistry

Length of Course: One year

Credit: 1.0

HORTICULTURE I

This course is an introduction to the principals and practices in the development, production and use of horticultural crops (fruits, vegetables, greenhouse, turf, nursery, floral and landscape). Includes classification, structure, growth and development, and environmental influences on horticultural plants, horticultural technology, and an introduction to the horticultural industries. A good deal of time will be spent in the greenhouse producing crops and observing test plots. Completion of this course counts as one credit toward science graduation credits.

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry or Introductory Agriculture course

Length of Course:One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE

This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field. Basic concepts in animal science, plant science, horticulture, natural resources, agribusiness management, agricultural mechanics, agricultural biotechnology, food science technology,  environmental science, and aquaculture science and technology will be presented. The development of leadership, employability and computer skills will also be taught.

Because FFA and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) are integral components of this course, students are required to maintain SAE and participate in activities of the FFA organization. Students are evaluated through completion of class projects, homework, participation during labs and field trips, and exams.

Prerequisite: None

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HONORS ANATOMY I

Human anatomy and comparative vertebrate anatomy is emphasized. Systems explored will include cells and tissues, skeletal, nervous and muscular.  For the human, the text and charts are used and rats are dissected and compared to human anatomy.  this course is meant to prepare students pursuing medical and related fields.  This course will be offered every other year in rotation with Anatomy II.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and completion of Biology with B average and departmental approval

Length of Course: One semester (5 of 6)

Credit: 0.5

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

This course examines the relationship of agriculture and the environment.  The impact of plant and animal production practices on the environment and the adoption of practices leading to improved air, land, and water quality are investigated.  Area of emphasis include:  types of ecosystems, management of waste, chemical use, soil conservation, land uses and regulations, and water and air quality.  Encouraging students to be conscious and concerned about the environment and recognizing the need to conserve the environment and its resources will be a theme throughout. Careers in environmental science will be examined.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HONORS PHYSICS / SENIOR

This is a college prep course for those interested in a science related or technical field. Students will be expected to use their math skills in an applied situation. Trigonometry will be used whenever possible in the course. Topics to be included are Momentum, Energy, Waves, Light, Magnetism, and Electricity. Students will be expected to do written lab reports on experiments done in the course.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and student must either be enrolled in College Algebra and Trigonometry or Calculus I or Calculus II. This course requires instructor approval.

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HONORS PHYSICS / JUNIORS - Semester 2

This course is a college prep course for those interested in a science related or technical field. Students who take the course will be expected to use their math skills in an applied situation. Trigonometry will be used whenever possible in the course. Students taking the course will be expected to do written lab reports on experiments done in the course and to achieve a passing grade on all chapter tests and written homework.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and enrolled in Geometry or College Algebra & Trigonometry. Instructor approval.

Length of Course: One year (one semester per course) (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HONORS CHEMISTRY 2 - Semester 1

This course will include topics not typically covered in a high school chemistry course. The topics covered in this course will include: aqueous reactions and solution stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gases, intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, and an introduction to organic chemistry.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and enrolled in Geometry or College Algebra & Trigonometry. Instructor approval.

Length of Course: One year (one semester per course) (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY / SOPHOMORE

This is a college prep course for above average students interested in going into a science-related or technical field. The expectations and topics covered are similar to Chemistry/Jr & Sr (176) but will be covered in more depth and at a faster pace.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing with instructor approval

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

CHEMISTRY / JUNIORS & SENIORS

This is a college prep course for average and above average students interested in going into a science related or technical field. The students who take the course will be expected to use their math skills in an applied situation. Those students interested in nursing, a medically related career, or engineering will be required to take chemistry in college and should strongly consider taking the course. Students will be required to do lab reports on experiments done in the course, written homework on the topics in the course, and achieve a passing grade on all chapter tests. The course content will include the study of atomic structure, trends in the periodic table, acid-base theory, the gas laws, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and properties of solids and liquids.

Prerequisite: Students must have passed Algebra 2 or be currently enrolled in the course.

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

SLU Biology – SLU Course BIOL 1240: Principals of Biology I

This course’s content includes principles of: nature of science, defining properties of living systems, biological macromolecules, structure and function of cells, cellular metabolism, heredity, and animal structure, function and development.

There is a lab component to this course.  194 Lab is taken concurrently and carries a weight of 0.50 credit for the year.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior status, Departmental approval, Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of Course: One year (every day)

Credit: 1.5

BASIC BIOLOGY

This course covers the main areas of life science in an understandable and non-technical manner. The subjects include the scientific method, cells, biochemistry, genetics, plants, animals, protists, systems of the body, nutrition and disease. It will prepare the student for future courses in Environment or Chemistry. This course is geared to the student who needs some individual help and remediation.

Prerequisite: Freshman

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

BIOLOGY

The major topics covered in this course include scientific method, cell studies, biochemistry, genetics, classification, protists, plants, animals and systems. These topics prepare students for future biology courses, as well as environment and anatomy. Topics are also useful in terms of daily health problems, etc. Prerequisite: Freshmen Upperclass –instructor approval Length of course: One year (5 of 6) Credit: 1.0

Prerequisite: Freshmen; Upperclass –instructor approval

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

BASIC PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Basic Physical Science is a fundamental science course designed as an introduction for various science areas. The basics of Chemistry, Physics and Earth Science are included in this course. The course can be used as a preparation for Chemistry. This course is geared to the student who needs some remediation and individual help.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing with placement by department

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Physical Science is an introduction into chemistry and physics. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of chemistry and physics. The topics covered include matter and energy, chemistry in our world, motion, forces and electricity. It is important that students learn that science is a method of obtaining knowledge and understanding, and not merely a collection of facts. The students taking this course will be expected to complete laboratory experiments and written homework successfully and achieve a passing grade on all chapter tests.

Prerequisite: Sophomore level with placement by the department

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED BIOLOGY

The major topics covered in this course include the same topics as Biology 173 but will cover more in depth and at a faster pace.  These topics prepare students for future biology courses, as well as chemistry, agricultural sciences and anatomy.  Topics are also useful in terms of daily health problems, etc.

Prerequisite: Above average score on placement test. Upperclass: Instructor approval

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

SOIL SCIENCE

This soil science course is offered to students to develop knowledge and skills pertaining to understanding soils, media components, soil formation, soil color, soil profile, soil texture and structure, understanding erosion, and management practices.  Students taking this course must complete a meaningful SAE and keep accurate records.  Membership and participation in the FFA is recommended.  Completion of this course counts as one credit toward science graduation credits.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HORTICULTURE II

This course focuses on the greenhouse management floral design and related segments of the horticulture industry.  Major units of study include floriculture plant identification, greenhouse structures, and the culture of greenhouse crops.  Agribusiness units will be introduced in merchandising, advertising, sales, and operating a retail floral business.  Completion of this course counts as one credit toward science graduation credits.

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry or Introduction to Agriculture course.

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HONORS ANATOMY II

Human anatomy and comparative vertebrate anatomy is emphasized. Systems explored will include respiratory, cardiovascular and digestive.  For the human, the text and charts are used and fetal pigs are dissected and compared to human anatomy. This course is meant to prepare students who are interested in pursuing medical and related fields. This course will be offered every other year in rotation with Anatomy I.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing and completion of Biology with B average and departmental approval.

Length of Course: One semester (5 of 6)

Credit: 0.50

BASIC HORTICULTURE

This is an introductory course for students with a strong interest in horticulture. Careers in the industry are covered as well as basic plant systems and pest control. The student will be introduced to the areas of greenhouse management, nursery management, and landscaping.

Length of course: 1 year (5 of 6)

Credits: 1.0

INTRO TO AGRIBUSINESS

This course will focus on Farm Business Management, where students will learn about budgets, revenues, expenses, business analysis, cost of loans, principal and interest, and financial tools. They will also learn about economics, marketing, taxes, accounting, and personal finance.

 

Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior standing

Length of Course:  One year (5 of 6)

Credit:  1.0

US HISTORY / JUNIOR

The class will examine American politics, society, and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course will include the development of domestic and foreign policy, urban and social reform, and industrial America. Students will learn if the United States has been true to its founding ideals.

Prerequisite: Required for all juniors not enrolled in Advanced US History or SLU credited History

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

ORIGINS OF MODERN WORLD, 1500 TO THE PRESENT – SLU HIST 1120

In understanding the development of the modern Western world, students in this course will examine the impact of the European Renaissance and Enlightenment.  Themes covered include trans-Atlantic encounters; religious reformation and warfare; new ideas regarding science, politics, and economics; and late 18th century revolutions and their effect on today’s world.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

ORIGINS OF MODERN WORLD TO 1500 – SLU HIST1110

This course examines the developmental and conceptual approach to Europe as the confluence of Western and Eastern civilizations, utilizing a Big History approach.  Students in this course conduct case studies on ancient civilizations that lend to the discussions on today’s world.  This course also examines the rise of religion, particularly Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and the impacts of religion on medieval and early modern Europe.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

HISTORY OF UNITED STATES SINCE 1865 – SLU HIST2610

This course will survey major social, cultural, political, and economic events that shaped the United States after the American Civil War.  Students will apply critical thinking skills to question history’s authenticity and portrayal in text books and the media and apply these understandings to today’s world.  This course also requires the completion of a 10-12 page research paper.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

HISTORY OF UNITED STATES TO 1865 – SLU HIST 2600

This course examines the development of the United States from its pre-Columbian origins through the Civil War.  Students will also learn collegiate-level research and writing methods and higher-level critical thinking techniques that will be applied to the completion of a 10 page research paper in the second semester.  (SLU HIST 2610)

Prerequisite: Junior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of Course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5

ADVANCED WORLD HISTORY / SOPHOMORE

This class will examine the major events of 20th and 21st century history, and how they facilitated the world’s transition into its modern condition.  Students will study global conflicts, making key connections between the past and the present, to better understand history and the world today.  This class will cover the same topics as World History/Sophomore, but at an accelerated pace.

Prerequisite: Instructor recommendation

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

WORLD HISTORY / SOPHOMORE

The class will examine the rise of the European nations and the impact their struggles had on the world. Topics include transitioning into the modern world, global conflict, and global connections.  Students will learn how different forces interact in a global community.

Prerequisite: Required for all sophomores not enrolled in Advanced World History/Soph

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED FRESHMAN CIVICS

Through the study of civics, government, and the economy, students will acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to become responsible and effective citizens in an inter-dependent and inter-connected world.  Students will need a practical understanding of these systems that affect their lives as consumers and citizens.  Students will also be able to understand their role as citizens at all levels of government and in society today.  This class will cover the same topics as the Civics class, but at an accelerated pace.

Prerequisite: Determined by placement test and standardized test scores; should exhibit strong reading and writing skills.

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

FRESHMAN CIVICS

Civics includes instruction on government institutions and the role that citizenship plays in America today, through discussions, student-led projects, and simulation of democratic processes.  Civics is a required course for all freshmen.

Prerequisite: None

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

ADVANCED US HISTORY / JUNIOR

This course examines the development of the United States, from its pre-Columbian origins through the mid-20th century.  The advanced class loosely follows the content covered in the Honors/SLU course with the goal of students advancing into SLU History their senior year.  This course also requires the completion of a 7-9 page research paper.

Prerequisite: Instructor recommendation

Length of Course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

This course is an introduction to psychology, which is the study of the mind, brain, and behavior. Students will have an opportunity to learn about the science of psychology, how people function in society, and human behavior. This course provides basic knowledge of the discipline of psychology and an introduction to the key concepts and principles of psychology.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior

Length of Course: One semester (every other day) -Semester 1

Credit: 0.25

CO SPANISH 3 - Semester 2 - SLU Course: SPX110

Students will increase their language proficiency, build their fluency, consolidate their foundation and expand their knowledge. Students will focus on all four language skills: listening, writing, reading, and speaking in addition to cultural awareness. Students with a GPA of 3.0 or above may enroll in the St. Louis U. 1-8-1-8 program and earn three college credits second semester (SLU Sp 110). Cost in 2013-14 is $65.00 per credit paid directly to the University.  Note: second semester course is HN Span 3 (137) if not taken for college credit from SLU.

Prerequisite: Dept. approval and minimum of B in Spanish 2 or special department approval

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

HN SPANISH 3/CO SPANISH 3 - SLU Course SPAN1010

Students will increase their language proficiency and build their fluency. Students will focus on all four­ language skills: listening, writing, reading, and speaking in addition to cultural awareness.

Note: second semester course is HN Span 3 (137) if not taken for college credit from SLU.

Students with a GPA of 3.0 or above may enroll in the St. Louis U. 1-8-1-8 program and earn three college credits second semester   (SLU course SPAN1010). Cost  is $65.00 per credit paid directly to the University.

Prerequisite: Department approval and minimum of B in Spanish 2

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

CO SPANISH 4 – SLU Courses: SPAN1020 (Sem. 1) / SPAN2010 (Sem. 2)

Spanish 4 is an intense language course. All four skills are practiced: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on composition and conversation. Students learn to read foreign newspapers in Spanish and come to an awareness of what is happening in the Spanish-speaking world today. They will become acquainted with literature of Spain and Latin America.

*Students with a GPA of 3.0 or above who have completed SLU Spanish 1010 may enroll in the St. Louis U 1-8-1-8 program and earn three college credits PER SEMESTER: (SLU Span1020 sem 1) (SLU Span2010, sem. 2) Cost  is $65.00 per credit.

Note: HN SPAN 4 (134) is course name/number if Spanish 4 is not taken for college credit.

Prerequisite: Department approval and a minimum of B average in HN/CO Spanish 3

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADV SPANISH 2

Advanced Spanish 2 will build on the communication skills learned in Spanish 1 to increase the student’s ability to use the language. Cultural awareness is continued with new themes. Students will move at a more rapid pace than Spanish 2.

Prerequisite: A minimum of B average in Spanish 1 and departmental approval

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

SPANISH 2

Spanish 2 will build on the communication skills learned in Spanish 1 to increase the student’s ability to use the language. Cultural awareness is continued with new themes.

Prerequisite: A minimum of C average in Spanish 1 and/or departmental approval

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

ADV SPANISH I

Honors Spanish I will move at a more rapid pace than Spanish I.  It is for those students with high scores in Mathematics and Language on the placement exam, or simply have a natural ability for language study, as evidenced by performance in Spanish at the elementary school level.

Prerequisite: Department approval or recommendation by grade school teacher of Spanish

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0

SPANISH 1

Spanish 1 is an introductory course offered to students to enrich their cultural, professional and personal life through the learning of the second most commonly used language in our country. Students will learn basic listening, writing, reading and speaking skills in the target language, as well as becoming familiar with the cultures where it is used.

Prerequisite: Department approval

Length of Course: One year (5 of 6)

Credit: 1.0