Social Studies

red arrow FRESHMAN CIVICS 206

Civics includes instruction on government institutions and the role that citizenship plays in America today, through discussions, student-led projects, and simulation of democratic processes.  Civics is a required course for all freshmen.

Prerequisite: None

Length of course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0


red arrow ADVANCED FRESHMAN CIVICS 207

Through the study of civics, government, and the economy, students will acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to become responsible and effective citizens in an inter-dependent and inter-connected world.  Students will need a practical understanding of these systems that affect their lives as consumers and citizens.  Students will also be able to understand their role as citizens at all levels of government and in society today.  This class will cover the same topics as the Civics class, but at an accelerated pace.

Prerequisite: Determined by placement test and standardized test scores; should exhibit strong reading and writing skills.

Length of course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0


red arrow WORLD HISTORY / SOPHOMORE 210

The class will examine the rise of the European nations and the impact their struggles had on the world. Topics include transitioning into the modern world, global conflict, and global connections.  Students will learn how different forces interact in a global community.

Prerequisite: Required for all sophomores not enrolled in Advanced World History/Soph

Length of course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0


red arrow ADVANCED WORLD HISTORY / SOPHOMORE 212

This class will examine the major events of 20th and 21st century history, and how they facilitated the world's transition into its modern condition.  Students will study global conflicts, making key connections between the past and the present, to better understand history and the world today.  This class will cover the same topics as World History/Sophomore, but at an accelerated pace.

Prerequisite: Instructor recommendation

Length of course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0


red arrow US HISTORY/JUNIOR 221

The class will examine American politics, society, and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries.  This course will include the development of domestic and foreign policy, urban and social reform, and industrial America.  Students will learn if the United States has been true to its founding ideals.

Prerequisite: Required for all juniors not enrolled in Advanced US History or SLU credited History

Length of course: One year (Every other day)

Credit: 1.0


red arrow ADVANCED US HISTORY / JUNIOR 222

This course examines the development of the United States, from its pre-Columbian origins through the mid-20th century.  The advanced class loosely follows the content covered in the Honors/SLU course with the goal of students advancing into SLU History their senior year.  This course also requires the completion of a 7-9 page research paper.

Prerequisite: Instructor recommendation

Length of course: One year (every other day)

Credit: 1.0


red arrow GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 260

This course is an introduction to psychology, which is the study of the mind, brain, and behavior. Students will have an opportunity to learn about the science of psychology, how people function in society, and human behavior. This course provides basic knowledge of the discipline of psychology and an introduction to the key concepts and principles of psychology.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior

Length of course: One semester (every other day) – Semester 1

Credit: 0.25


red arrow SOCIOLOGY 263

This course is an introduction to sociology, which is the study of human society, culture and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity, conflict, social institutions, social groups, social patterns and social change. This course provides basic knowledge of how people organize themselves and interact with one another. Additionally, students will study sociological concepts and how they apply to different individuals, groups and social structures, from the perspective of various sociological theories.

Prerequisite: Junior/Senior status

Length of course: One semester (every other day) - Semester 2

Credit: 0.25


red arrow HISTORY OF UNITED STATES TO 1865 – SLU HIST 2600 270

This course examines the development of the United States from its pre-Columbian origins through the Civil War.  Students will also learn collegiate-level research and writing methods and higher-level critical thinking techniques that will be applied to the completion of a 10 page research paper in the second semester.  (SLU HIST 2610)  

Prerequisite: Junior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5


red arrow HISTORY OF UNITED STATES SINCE 1865 – SLU HIST2610 271

This course will survey major social, cultural, political, and economic events that shaped the United States after the American Civil War.  Students will apply critical thinking skills to question history's authenticity and portrayal in text books and the media and apply these understandings to today's world.  This course also requires the completion of a 10-12 page research paper.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5


red arrow ORIGINS OF MODERN WORLD TO 1500 – SLU HIST1110 272

This course examines the developmental and conceptual approach to Europe as the confluence of Western and Eastern civilizations, utilizing a Big History approach.  Students in this course conduct case studies on ancient civilizations that lend to the discussions on today's world.  This course also examines the rise of religion, particularly Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and the impacts of religion on medieval and early modern Europe.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5


red arrow ORIGINS OF MODERN WORLD, 1500 TO THE PRESENT – SLU HIST 1120 273

In understanding the development of the modern Western world, students in this course will examine the impact of the European Renaissance and Enlightenment.  Themes covered include trans-Atlantic encounters; religious reformation and warfare; new ideas regarding science, politics, and economics; and late 18th century revolutions and their effect on today's world.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and instructor recommendation. Minimum 3.0 GPA

Length of course: One semester (every other day)

Credit: 0.5